’60s conflict site

This time we are looking on the crossword puzzle clue for: ’60s conflict site.
it’s A 24 letters crossword definition.
Next time when searching the web for a clue, try using the search term “’60s conflict site crossword” or “’60s conflict site crossword clue” when searching for help with your puzzles. Below you will find the possible answers for ’60s conflict site.

We hope you found what you needed!
If you are still unsure with some definitions, don’t hesitate to search them here with our crossword puzzle solver.

Possible Answers:

NAM.

Last seen on: NY Times Crossword 4 Jun 19, Tuesday

Random information on the term “’60s conflict site”:

E (named e /iː/, plural ees) is the fifth letter and the second vowel in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. It is the most commonly used letter in many languages, including Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Hungarian, Latin, Latvian, Norwegian, Spanish, and Swedish.

The Latin letter ‘E’ differs little from its source, the Greek letter epsilon, ‘Ε’. This in turn comes from the Semitic letter hê, which has been suggested to have started as a praying or calling human figure (hillul ‘jubilation’), and was probably based on a similar Egyptian hieroglyph that indicated a different pronunciation. In Semitic, the letter represented /h/ (and /e/ in foreign words); in Greek, hê became the letter epsilon, used to represent /e/. The various forms of the Old Italic script and the Latin alphabet followed this usage.

Although Middle English spelling used ⟨e⟩ to represent long and short /e/, the Great Vowel Shift changed long /eː/ (as in ‘me’ or ‘bee’) to /iː/ while short /ɛ/ (as in ‘met’ or ‘bed’) remained a mid vowel. In other cases, the letter is silent, generally at the end of words.

’60s conflict site on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “NAM”:

NAM (also sold under the name Napalm in Walmart retail outlets) is a commercial Build engine first-person shooter video game set during the Vietnam War, developed by TNT Team and published by GT Interactive Software. It originated from the creation of TNT Team’s 1997 total conversion mod for Duke Nukem 3D titled Platoon. It was picked up by Infogrames, who put them to work on a remake with more professional art and some custom source code modifications by Matt Saettler, product manager for Blood, which resulted in NAM. The game was released on July 31, 1998. U.S. Marine Sergeant Dan Snyder, who helped pioneer computer simulation training for American troops with a Doom army mod, was a consultant on the project. NAM was later re-released on Steam on November 6, 2014, with Retroism and Night Dive Studios as the publishers.

The direct sequel, World War II GI, was released in 1999, again developed by TNT Team and published by GT Interactive Software.

NAM on Wikipedia