Apprehension

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Possible Answers:

DREAD.

Last seen on: –NewsDay Crossword January 22 2023
The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Apr 11 2021
The Telegraph – QUICK CROSSWORD NO: 29,476 – Sep 23 2020
Universal Crossword – Aug 9 2020
The Washington Post Crossword – Jun 28 2020
LA Times Crossword 28 Jun 20, Sunday

Random information on the term “Apprehension”:

In psychology, apprehension (Lat. ad, “to”; prehendere, “to seize”) is a term applied to a model of consciousness in which nothing is affirmed or denied of the object in question, but the mind is merely aware of (“seizes”) it.

“Judgment” (says Reid, ed. Hamilton, i. p. 414) “is an act of the mind, specifically different from simple apprehension or the bare conception of a thing”. “Simple apprehension or conception can neither be true nor false.” This distinction provides for the large class of mental acts in which we are simply aware of, or “take in” a number of familiar objects, about which we in general make no judgment, unless our attention is suddenly called by a new feature. Or again, two alternatives may be apprehended without any resultant judgment as to their respective merits.

Similarly, G.F. Stout stated that while we have a very vivid idea of a character or an incident in a work of fiction, we can hardly be said in any real sense to have any belief or to make any judgment as to its existence or truth. With this mental state may be compared the purely aesthetic contemplation of music, wherein apart from, say, a false note, the faculty of judgment is for the time inoperative. To these examples may be added the fact that one can fully understand an argument in all its bearings, without in any way judging its validity. Without going into the question fully, it may be pointed out that the distinction between judgment and apprehension is relative. In every kind of thought, there is judgment of some sort in a greater or less degree of prominence.

Apprehension on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “DREAD”:

Angst means fear or anxiety (anguish is its Latinate equivalent, and anxious, anxiety are of similar origin). The dictionary definition for angst is a feeling of anxiety, apprehension, or insecurity. The word angst was introduced into English from the Danish, Norwegian, and Dutch word angst and the German word Angst. It is attested since the 19th century in English translations of the works of Kierkegaard and Freud. It is used in English to describe an intense feeling of apprehension, anxiety, or inner turmoil.

In other languages, having the meaning of the Latin word pavor for “fear”, the derived words differ in meaning; for example, as in the French anxiété and peur. The word angst has existed since the 8th century, from the Proto-Indo-European root *anghu-, “restraint” from which Old High German angust developed. It is pre-cognate with the Latin angustia, “tensity, tightness” and angor, “choking, clogging”; compare to the Ancient Greek ἄγχω (ánkhō) “strangle”.

DREAD on Wikipedia