Ballpark figure

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Possible Answers:

UMP.

Last seen on: –Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 6 2021
NY Times Crossword 15 Jan 21, Friday
NY Times Crossword 18 Sep 19, Wednesday

Random information on the term “Ballpark figure”:

In physics and mathematics, an ansatz (/ˈænsæts/; German: [ˈʔanzats], meaning: “initial placement of a tool at a work piece”, plural ansätze /ˈænsɛtsə/; German: [ˈʔanzɛtsə] or ansatzes) is an educated guess that is verified later by its results.

An ansatz is the establishment of the starting equation(s), the theorem(s), or the value(s) describing a mathematical or physical problem or solution. It can take into consideration boundary conditions. After an ansatz has been established (constituting nothing more than an assumption), the equations are solved for the general function of interest (constituting a confirmation of the assumption).

Given a set of experimental data that looks to be clustered about a line, a linear ansatz could be made to find the parameters of the line by a least squares curve fit. Variational approximation methods use ansätze and then fit the parameters.

Another example could be the mass, energy, and entropy balance equations that, considered simultaneous for purposes of the elementary operations of linear algebra, are the ansatz to most basic problems of thermodynamics.

Ballpark figure on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “UMP”:

During 1944, Walter Baade categorized groups of stars within the Milky Way into stellar populations. He noticed that bluer stars were strongly associated with the spiral arms and yellow stars dominated near the central galactic bulge and within globular star clusters. Two main divisions were defined as Population I and Population II, with another newer division called Population III added in 1978, which are often simply abbreviated as Pop I, II or III.

Between the population types, significant differences were found with their individual observed stellar spectra. These were later shown to be very important, and were possibly related to star formation, observed kinematics, stellar age, and even galaxy evolution in both spiral or elliptical galaxies. These three simple population classes usefully divided stars by their chemical composition or metallicity,[a][b] whose small proportion of chemical abundance consists of heavier elements against the far more abundant hydrogen and helium.

UMP on Wikipedia