Cut

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Possible Answers:

SNIP.

Last seen on: –The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Dec 27 2020
LA Times Crossword 13 Dec 20, Sunday
LA Times Crossword 13 Dec 20, Sunday
NY Times Crossword 20 Nov 20, Friday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 3 2020
NY Times Crossword 31 May 20, Sunday
Wall Street Journal Crossword – May 21 2020 – To the Letter
NY Times Crossword 21 Nov 19, Thursday
Wall Street Journal Crossword – October 06 2019 – Played Out

Random information on the term “Cut”:

In archaeology and archaeological stratification a cut or truncation is a context that represents a moment in time when other archaeological deposits were removed for the creation of some feature such as a ditch or pit. In layman’s terms, a cut can be thought of a hole that was dug in the past, though cut also applies to other parts of the archaeological record such as horizontal truncations like terraced ground. A cut context is sometimes referred to as a “negative context” as opposed to a “positive context”. The term denotes that a cut has removed material from the archaeological record or natural at the time of its creation as opposed to a positive context which adds material to the archaeological record. A cut has zero thickness and no material properties of its own and is defined by the limits of other contexts. Cuts are seen in the record by virtue of the difference between the material it was cut through and the material that back fills it. This difference is seen as an “edge” by the archaeologists on site. This is shown in the picture above (Fig 1.), where a half sectioned Saxon pit has had half its backfill removed and we can clearly see a difference between the ground the pit was cut into and the material originally filling the pit. Sometimes these differences are not clear and an archaeologist must rely on experience and insight to discover cuts.

Cut on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SNIP”:

Scotland-Northern Ireland Pipeline (SNIP) is a 24-inch, 135 km long natural gas pipeline which runs from Twynholm, Scotland and Islandmagee in Northern Ireland.

In March 1992 Northern Ireland Secretary Peter Brooke announced the first stage of the privatisation of Northern Ireland Electricity, the province’s nationalised utility company; A major part of this was the sale of Ballylumford power station in Northern Ireland to British Gas for £132 million. This oil-fired power plant provided more than half of the power needs of the 600,000 customers in Northern Ireland. British Gas simultaneously announced its plans to set up Premier Transco to build and operate a natural gas pipeline between Scotland and Northern Ireland, to convert Ballylumford to natural gas, and to set up a commercial supply company for natural gas (what would become Phoenix Natural Gas).

In 1994 Premier Transco awarded the contract for design and construction of the SNIP to European Marine Contractors (EMC), a 50-50 venture of Brown & Root Inc. and Saipem. Pipe production began in 1994 at the Hartlepool, England, plant of British Steel plc. EMC used the Castoro Sei semi-submersible laybarge to install the line. The pipeline was completed in 1996

SNIP on Wikipedia