Eloquent, sliding in car on ice

This time we are looking on the crossword puzzle clue for: Eloquent, sliding in car on ice.
it’s A 31 letters crossword definition.
Next time when searching the web for a clue, try using the search term “Eloquent, sliding in car on ice crossword” or “Eloquent, sliding in car on ice crossword clue” when searching for help with your puzzles. Below you will find the possible answers for Eloquent, sliding in car on ice.

We hope you found what you needed!
If you are still unsure with some definitions, don’t hesitate to search them here with our crossword puzzle solver.

Possible Answers:

ciceronian.

Last seen on: The Guardian – Cryptic Crossword No 28,573 – Oct 11 2021

Random information on the term “ciceronian”:

A consul held the highest elected political office of the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and ancient Romans considered the consulship the second-highest level of the cursus honorum (an ascending sequence of public offices to which politicians aspired) after that of the censor. Each year, the Centuriate Assembly elected two consuls to serve jointly for a one-year term. The consuls alternated in holding fasces each month when both were in Rome and a consul’s imperium extended over Rome and all its provinces.

There were two consuls in order to create a check on the power of any individual citizen in accordance with the republican belief that the powers of the rex Romae should be spread out into multiple offices.

After the establishment of the Empire (27 BC), the consuls became mere symbolic representatives of Rome’s republican heritage and held very little power and authority, with the Emperor acting as the supreme authority.

After the legendary expulsion of the last King, Tarquin the Proud, a harsh ruler at the end of the Roman Kingdom, most of the powers and authority of the king were ostensibly given to the newly instituted consulship. This change in leadership came about when the king’s son, Sextus Tarquinius, raped the wives and daughters of powerful Roman nobles. A group of nobles led by Lucius Junius Brutus, with the support of the Roman Army, expelled Tarquinius and his family from Rome in 509 BC. Originally, consuls were called praetors (“leader”), referring to their duties as the chief military commanders. By at least 300 BC the title of Consul became commonly used. Ancient writers usually derive the title consul from the Latin verb consulere, “to take counsel”, but this is most likely a later gloss of the term, which probably derives—in view of the joint nature of the office—from con- and sal-, “get together” or from con- and sell-/sedl-, “sit down together with” or “next to”. In Greek, the title was originally rendered as στρατηγὸς ὕπατος, strategos hypatos (“the supreme general”), and later simply as ὕπατος.

ciceronian on Wikipedia