Harvest

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it’s A 7 letters crossword definition.
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Possible Answers:

REAP.

Last seen on: –Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 23 2021
NY Times Crossword 10 Mar 21, Wednesday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 6 2021
Universal Crossword – Feb 18 2021
USA Today Crossword – Dec 22 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 23 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 23 2020
The Washington Post Crossword – Sep 8 2020
LA Times Crossword 8 Sep 20, Tuesday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 1 2020
Universal Crossword – Aug 6 2020
Universal Crossword – May 26 2020
Wall Street Journal Crossword – May 05 2020 – Knight Line
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Apr 1 2020
NY Times Crossword 9 Mar 20, Monday
NY Times Crossword 30 Dec 19, Monday
Wall Street Journal Crossword – October 30 2019 – Bad Beginning

Random information on the term “Harvest”:

The modern old combine harvester, or simply combiners, is a versatile machine designed to efficiently harvest a variety of grain crops. The name derives from its combining three separate harvesting operations—reaping, threshing, and winnowing—into a single process. Among the crops harvested with a combine are wheat, oats, rye, barley, corn (maize), sorghum, soybeans, flax (linseed), sunflowers and canola. The separated straw, left lying on the field, comprises the stems and any remaining leaves of the crop with limited nutrients left in it: the straw is then either chopped, spread on the field and ploughed back in or baled for bedding and limited-feed for livestock.

Combine harvesters are one of the most economically important labour saving inventions, significantly reducing the fraction of the population engaged in agriculture.

In 1826 in Scotland, the inventor Reverend Patrick Bell designed (but did not patent) a reaper machine, which used the scissors principle of plant cutting – a principle that is still used today. The Bell machine was pushed by horses. A few Bell machines were available in the United States. In 1835, in the United States, Hiram Moore built and patented the first combine harvester, which was capable of reaping, threshing and winnowing cereal grain. Early versions were pulled by horse, mule or ox teams. In 1835, Moore built a full-scale version with a length of 5.2 m (17 ft), cut width of 4.57 m (15 ft) and by 1839, over 20 ha (50 acres) of crops were harvested. This combine harvester was pulled by 20 horses fully handled by farmhands. By 1860, combine harvesters with a cutting, or swathe, width of several metres were used on American farms.

Harvest on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “REAP”:

The Reserve Educational Assistance Program (REAP) was established as a part of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005. It is a new Department of Defense education benefit program designed to provide educational assistance to members of the Reserve components called or ordered to active duty in response to a war or national emergency (contingency operation) as declared by the President or Congress. This new program makes certain reservists who were activated for at least 90 days after September 11, 2001 either eligible for education benefits or eligible for increased benefits.

G.I. Bill

REAP on Wikipedia