Hoodlum

This time we are looking on the crossword puzzle clue for: Hoodlum.
it’s A 7 letters crossword definition.
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Possible Answers:

THUG.

Last seen on: –Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 5 2022
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jun 18 2022
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Apr 6 2022
The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Mar 25 2021
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 23 2021
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 13 2020

Random information on the term “Hoodlum”:

Hooliganism is disruptive or unlawful behavior such as rioting, bullying and vandalism, usually in connection with crowds at sporting events.

There are several theories regarding the origin of the word hooliganism, which is a derivative of the word hooligan. The Compact Oxford English Dictionary states that the word may have originated from the surname of a rowdy Irish family in a music hall song of the 1890s. Clarence Rook, in his 1899 book, Hooligan Nights, wrote that the word came from Patrick Hoolihan (or Hooligan), an Irish bouncer and thief who lived in London. In 2015, it was said in the BBC Scotland TV programme The Secret Life of Midges that the English commander-in-chief during the Jacobite rising of 1745, General Wade, misheard the local Scots Gaelic word for midge—meanbh-chuileag—and coined the word hooligan to describe his fury and frustration at the way the tiny biting creatures made the life of his soldiers and himself a misery; this derivation may be apocryphal.

Hoodlum on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “THUG”:

Thug Behram (c. 1765 – 1840), also known as Buhram Jamedar and the King of the Thugs, was a leader of the Thuggee cult active in Oudh in northern central India during the late 18th and early 19th century, and is often cited as one of the world’s most prolific serial killers. He may have been involved in up to 931 murders by strangulation between 1790–1840 performed with a ceremonial rumāl, a handkerchief-like cloth used by his cult as a garrote. Buhram was executed in 1840 by hanging.

While Behram is sometimes suspected of having committed 931 murders, James Paton, an East India Company officer working for the Thuggee and Dacoity Office in the 1830s who wrote a manuscript on Thuggee, quotes Buhram as saying he had “been present” at 931 cases of murder, and “I may have strangled with my own hands about 125 men, and I may have seen strangled 150 more.”

The English word ‘thug’ is in fact borrowed from the Hindi word ‘thag’ (ठग). The thugs were covert members of a group, and the term ‘Thugee’ typically referred to an act of deceitful and organised robbery and murder.

THUG on Wikipedia