Local bond, briefly

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Possible Answers:

MUNI.

Last seen on: LA Times Crossword 16 Jan 20, Thursday

Random information on the term “MUNI”:

The Key System (or Key Route) was a privately owned company that provided mass transit in the cities of Oakland, Berkeley, Alameda, Emeryville, Piedmont, San Leandro, Richmond, Albany, and El Cerrito in the eastern San Francisco Bay Area from 1903 until 1960, when it was sold to a newly formed public agency, AC Transit. The Key System consisted of local streetcar and bus lines in the East Bay, and commuter rail and bus lines connecting the East Bay to San Francisco by a ferry pier on San Francisco Bay, later via the lower deck of the Bay Bridge. At its height during the 1940s, the Key System had over 66 miles (106 km) of track. The local streetcars were discontinued in 1948 and the commuter trains to San Francisco were discontinued in 1958. The Key System’s territory is today served by BART and AC Transit bus service.

The system was a consolidation of several streetcar lines assembled in the late 1890s and early 1900s by Francis Marion “Borax” Smith, an entrepreneur who made a fortune in his namesake mineral, and then turned to real estate and electric traction. The Key System began as the San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose Railway (SFOSJR), incorporated in 1902. Service began on October 26, 1903, with a four-car train carrying 250 passengers, departing downtown Berkeley for the ferry pier. Before the end of 1903, the general manager of the SFOSJR devised the idea of using a stylized map on which the system’s routes resembled an old-fashioned key, with three “handle loops” that covered the cities of Berkeley, Piedmont (initially, “Claremont” shared the Piedmont loop) and Oakland, and a “shaft” in the form of the Key pier, the “teeth” representing the ferry berths at the end of the pier. The company touted its ‘key route’, which led to the adoption of the name “Key System”.

MUNI on Wikipedia