Lumberjack’s tool

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Possible Answers:

Axe.

Last seen on: Daily Celebrity Crossword – 6/3/19 Movie Monday

Random information on the term “Axe”:

Coordinates: 54°26′49″N 3°03′50″W / 54.447°N 3.064°W / 54.447; -3.064

The Langdale axe industry is the name given by archaeologists to specialised stone tool manufacturing centred at Great Langdale in England’s Lake District during the Neolithic period (beginning about 4000 BC in Britain). The existence of a production site was originally suggested by chance discoveries in the 1930s, which were followed by more systematic searching in the 1940s and 1950s by Clare Fell and others. The finds were mainly reject axes, rough-outs and blades created by knapping large lumps of the rock found in the scree or perhaps by simple quarrying or opencast mining. Hammerstones have also been found in the scree and other lithic debitage from the industry such as blades and flakes.

The area has outcrops of fine-grained greenstone or hornstone suitable for making polished stone axes. Such axes have been found distributed across Great Britain. The rock is an epidotised greenstone quarried or perhaps just collected from the scree slopes in the Langdale Valley on Harrison Stickle and Pike of Stickle. The nature and extent of the axe-flaking sites making up the Langdale Axe Factory complex are still under investigation.Geological mapping has established that the volcanic tuff used for the axes outcrops along a narrow range of the highest peaks in the locality. Other outcrops in the area are known to have been worked, especially on Harrison Stickle, and Scafell Pike where rough-outs and flakes have been found on platforms below the peaks at and above the 2000- or 3000-foot level.

Axe on Wikipedia