Malice

This time we are looking on the crossword puzzle clue for: Malice.
it’s A 6 letters crossword definition.
Next time when searching the web for a clue, try using the search term “Malice crossword” or “Malice crossword clue” when searching for help with your puzzles. Below you will find the possible answers for Malice.

We hope you found what you needed!
If you are still unsure with some definitions, don’t hesitate to search them here with our crossword puzzle solver.

Possible Answers:

SPITE.

Last seen on: –Universal Crossword – Jun 21 2022 s
LA Times Crossword 12 Sep 21, Sunday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 22 2021
USA Today Crossword – Nov 8 2020
The Telegraph – QUICK CROSSWORD NO: 29,471 – Sep 17 2020

Random information on the term “Malice”:

Malice is a legal term referring to a party’s intention to do injury to another party. Malice is either expressed or implied. Malice is expressed when there is manifested a deliberate intention to unlawfully take away the life of a human being. Malice is implied when no considerable provocation appears, or when the circumstances attending the killing show an abandoned and malignant heart. Malice, in a legal sense, may be inferred from the evidence and imputed to the defendant, depending on the nature of the case.

In many kinds of cases, malice must be found to exist in order to convict. (For example, malice is an element of the crime of arson in many jurisdictions.) In civil law cases, a finding of malice allows for the award of greater damages, or for punitive damages. The legal concept of malice is most common in Anglo-American law, and in legal systems derived from the English common law system.

In English civil law (being the law of England and Wales), relevant case law in negligence and misfeasance in a public office includes Dunlop v. Woollahra Municipal Council [1982] A.C. 158; Bourgoin S.A. v. Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food [1986] Q.B. 716; Jones v Swansea City Council [1990] 1 WLR 1453; Three Rivers District Council and Others v Governor and Company of The Bank of England, [2000] and Elguzouli-Daf v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis [1995] 2 QB 335, in which Steyn LJ. found that malice could be made out if the acts were done with an actual intention to cause injury. Malice could be shown if the acts were done in the knowledge of invalidity or lack of power and with knowledge that it would cause or be likely to cause injury. Malice would also exist if the acts were done with reckless indifference or deliberate blindness to that invalidity or lack of power and that likely injury. These elements, with respect, are consistent with the views of the majority albeit that some of those views were expressed tentatively having regard to the basis upon which the case before them was presented.

Malice on Wikipedia