Punctuation mark

This time we are looking on the crossword puzzle clue for: Punctuation mark.
it’s A 16 letters crossword definition.
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Possible Answers:

COMMA.

Last seen on: –Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 24 2022
Irish Times Simplex – Dec 11 2020
The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Oct 1 2020

Random information on the term “Punctuation mark”:

“James while John had had had had had had had had had had had a better effect on the teacher” is an English sentence used to demonstrate lexical ambiguity and the necessity of punctuation,which serves as a substitute for the intonation, stress, and pauses found in speech.In human information processing research, the sentence has been used to show how readers depend on punctuation to give sentences meaning, especially in the context of scanning across lines of text. The sentence is sometimes presented as a puzzle, where the solver must add the punctuation.

The sentence refers to two students, James and John, who are required by an English test to describe a man who had suffered from a cold in the past. John writes “The man had a cold”, which the teacher marks incorrect, while James writes the correct “The man had had a cold”. Since James’s answer was right, it had had a better effect on the teacher.

The sentence is easier to understand with added punctuation and emphasis:

Punctuation mark on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “COMMA”:

Apposition is a grammatical construction in which two elements, normally noun phrases, are placed side by side, with one element serving to identify the other in a different way; the two elements are said to be in apposition. One of the elements is called the appositive, although its identification requires consideration of how the elements are used in a sentence.

For example, in the two sentences below, the phrases Alice Smith and my sister are in apposition, with the appositive identified with italics:

Traditionally, appositions were called by their Latin name appositio, although the English form is now more commonly used. It is derived from Latin: ad (“near”) and positio (“placement”).

Apposition is a figure of speech of the scheme type, and often results when the verbs (particularly verbs of being) in supporting clauses are eliminated to produce shorter descriptive phrases. This makes them often function as hyperbatons, or figures of disorder, because they can disrupt the flow of a sentence. For example, in the phrase: “My wife, a nurse by training, …”, it is necessary to pause before the parenthetical modification “a nurse by training”.

COMMA on Wikipedia