Sense of self

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Possible Answers:

EGO.

Last seen on: –Newsday.com Crossword – Apr 25 2022 Crossword Answers
Wall Street Journal Crossword – March 30 2022 – Best Play
Newsday.com Crossword – Mar 6 2022s
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 16 2022
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Universal Crossword – Feb 11 2022 s
Wall Street Journal Crossword – January 18 2022 – Camera Angles
NY Times Crossword 31 Oct 21, Sunday
Universal Crossword – Aug 29 2021
NY Times Crossword 13 Jun 21, Sunday
NY Times Crossword 12 Jun 21, Saturday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Apr 1 2021
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 22 2021
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 28 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 1 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 17 2020
NY Times Crossword 10 Nov 20, Tuesday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 20 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 21 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 8 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 2 2020
Wall Street Journal Crossword – July 13 2020 – Back Breaking
Wall Street Journal Crossword – June 22 2020 – Handy
Wall Street Journal Crossword – May 18 2020 – On Alert
Newsday.com Crossword – Mar 17 2020
Wall Street Journal Crossword – December 17 2019 – Two-Part Harmony
Wall Street Journal Crossword – December 17 2019 – Two-Part Harmony

Random information on the term “Sense of self”:

Antiquity

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Modern

Iran

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East-Asia

Ego death is a “complete loss of subjective self-identity”. The term is used in various intertwined contexts, with related meanings. In Jungian psychology, the synonymous term psychic death is used, which refers to a fundamental transformation of the psyche. In death and rebirth mythology, ego death is a phase of self-surrender and transition, as described by Joseph Campbell in his research on the mythology of the Hero’s Journey. It is a recurrent theme in world mythology and is also used as a metaphor in some strands of contemporary western thinking.

In descriptions of psychedelic experiences, the term is used synonymously with ego-loss to refer to (temporary) loss of one’s sense of self due to the use of psychedelics. The term was used as such by Timothy Leary et al. to describe the death of the ego in the first phase of an LSD trip, in which a “complete transcendence” of the self[note 1] and the “game”[note 2] occurs. The concept is also used in contemporary spirituality and in the modern understanding of Eastern religions to describe a permanent loss of “attachment to a separate sense of self”[web 1] and self-centeredness. This conception is an influential part of Eckhart Tolle’s teachings, where Ego is presented as an accumulation of thoughts and emotions, continuously identified with, which creates the idea and feeling of being a separate entity, and only by disidentifying one’s consciousness from it can one truly be free from suffering (in the Buddhist meaning).

Sense of self on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “EGO”:

The pronoun I /aɪ/ is the first-person singular nominative case personal pronoun in Modern English. It is used to refer to one’s self and is capitalized, although other pronouns, such as he or she, are not capitalized.

The grammatical variants of I are me, my, mine, and myself.

English I originates from Old English (OE) ic. Its predecessor ic had in turn originated from the continuation of Proto-Germanic *ik, and ek; the asterisk denotes an unattested form, ek was attested in the Elder Futhark inscriptions (in some cases notably showing the variant eka; see also ek erilaz). Linguists assume ik to have developed from the unstressed variant of ek. Variants of ic were used in various English dialects up until the 1600s.

Germanic cognates are: Old Frisian ik, Old Norse ek (Danish, Norwegian jeg, Swedish jag, Icelandic ég), Old High German ih (German ich) and Gothic ik and in Dutch also “ik”.

The Proto-Germanic root came, in turn, from the Proto Indo-European language (PIE). The reconstructed PIE pronoun is *egō, egóm, with cognates includingSanskrit aham, Hittite uk, Latin ego, Greek ἐγώ egō, Old Slavonic azъ and Alviri-Vidari (an Iranian language) اَز az.

EGO on Wikipedia