'Shh!'

This time we are looking on the crossword puzzle clue for: 'Shh!'.
it’s A 14 letters crossword definition.
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Possible Answers:

QUIET.

Last seen on: USA Today Crossword – May 2 2021

Random information on the term “'Shh!'”:

E, or e, is the fifth letter and the second vowel letter in the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is e (pronounced /ˈiː/), plural ees. It is the most commonly used letter in many languages, including Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, French, German, Hungarian, Latin, Latvian, Norwegian, Spanish, and Swedish.

The Latin letter ‘E’ differs little from its source, the Greek letter epsilon, ‘Ε’. This in turn comes from the Semitic letter hê, which has been suggested to have started as a praying or calling human figure (hillul ‘jubilation’), and was most likely based on a similar Egyptian hieroglyph that indicated a different pronunciation. In Semitic, the letter represented /h/ (and /e/ in foreign words); in Greek, hê became the letter epsilon, used to represent /e/. The various forms of the Old Italic script and the Latin alphabet followed this usage.

Although Middle English spelling used ⟨e⟩ to represent long and short /e/, the Great Vowel Shift changed long /eː/ (as in ‘me’ or ‘bee’) to /iː/ while short /ɛ/ (as in ‘met’ or ‘bed’) remained a mid vowel. In other cases, the letter is silent, generally at the end of words.

'Shh!' on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “QUIET”:

The discovery of cosmic microwave background radiation constitutes a major development in modern physical cosmology. The cosmic background radiation (CMB) was measured by Andrew McKellar in 1941 at an effective temperature of 2.3 K using CN stellar absorption lines observed by W. S. Adams. Theoretical work around 1950 showed the need for a CMB for consistency with the simplest relativistic universe models. In 1964, US physicist Arno Penzias and radio-astronomer Robert Woodrow Wilson rediscovered the CMB, estimating its temperature as 3.5 K, as they experimented with the Holmdel Horn Antenna. The new measurements were accepted as important evidence for a hot early Universe (big bang theory) and as evidence against the rival steady state theory. In 1978, Penzias and Wilson were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics for their joint measurement.

By the middle of the 20th century, cosmologists had developed two different theories to explain the creation of the universe. Some supported the steady-state theory, which states that the universe has always existed and will continue to survive without noticeable change. Others believed in the Big Bang theory, which states that the universe was created in a massive explosion-like event billions of years ago (later determined to be approximately 13.8 billion years).

QUIET on Wikipedia