Two under par

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Possible Answers:

EAGLE.

Last seen on: –Universal Crossword – Sep 9 2021
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 25 2021

Random information on the term “Two under par”:

The origins of golf are unclear and much debated. However, it is generally accepted that modern golf developed in Scotland from the Middle Ages onwards. The game did not find international popularity until the late 19th century, when it spread into the rest of the United Kingdom and then to the British Empire and the United States.

A golf-like game is, apocryphally, recorded as taking place on February 26, 1297, in Loenen aan de Vecht, where the Dutch played a game with a stick and leather ball. The winner was whoever hit the ball with the fewest strokes into a target several hundred yards away. Some scholars argue that this game of putting a small ball in a hole in the ground using golf clubs was also played in 17th-century Netherlands and that this predates the game in Scotland.There are also other reports of earlier accounts of a golf-like game from continental Europe.

In the 1261 Middle Dutch manuscript of the Flemish poet Jacob van Maerlant’s Boeck Merlijn mention is made of a ball game “mit ener coluen” (with a colf/kolf [club]). This is the earliest known mention in the Dutch language of the game of colf/kolf as played in the Low Countries.

Two under par on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “EAGLE”:

Eagle is a village in the North Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. It is situated 7 miles (11 km) south-west from Lincoln and 2 miles (3.2 km) east from North Scarle. Eagle is part of the civil parish of Eagle and Swinethorpe. The population of the civil parish taken at the 2011 census was 793.

All Saints Anglican church dates from the 13th century and is Grade II listed. It was rebuilt in the 18th century and again in 1904.

The village has a primary school, post office, village hall, park, nursing home, playing field, and public house.

Scholars believe that the name means “Oak-tree wood or clearing.”, from Old English āc, an oak-tree and Old English lēah, a forest, wood, glade or clearing.

Eagle appears in Domesday Book: the landowners were: Roger of Poitou (property formerly by Arnketill Barn), Durand Malet, Odo the Crossbowman (land formerly owned by Gunnketill), and Countess Judith (land formerly owned by Earl Waltheof of Northumbria). Eagle had a church and a priest. Countess Judith’s manor had a value of £12. Countess Judith was a niece of King William I of England – she was the daughter of his half-sister Adelaide of Normandy and her husband Lambert II, Count of Lens. She was also the widow of Earl Waltheof of Northumbria (1072–75, the last of the Anglo-Saxon Earls of England) who she had betrayed over his part in the Revolt of the Earls, and who was executed in 1076.[original research?][citation needed]

EAGLE on Wikipedia