Wheels

This time we are looking on the crossword puzzle clue for: Wheels.
it’s A 6 letters crossword definition.
Next time when searching the web for a clue, try using the search term “Wheels crossword” or “Wheels crossword clue” when searching for help with your puzzles. Below you will find the possible answers for Wheels.

We hope you found what you needed!
If you are still unsure with some definitions, don’t hesitate to search them here with our crossword puzzle solver.

Possible Answers:

CAR.

Last seen on: –L.A. Times Daily Crossword – Aug 18 2022
Newsday.com Crossword – Mar 12 2022s

Random information on the term “Wheels”:

Snow chains, or tire chains, are devices fitted to the tires of vehicles to provide maximum traction when driving through snow and ice.

Snow chains attach to the drive wheels of a vehicle or special systems deploy chains which swing under the tires automatically. Although named after steel chain, snow chains may be made of other materials and in a variety of patterns and strengths. Chains are usually sold in pairs and often must be purchased to match a particular tire size (tire diameter and tread width), although some designs can be adjusted to fit various sizes of tire. Driving with chains reduces fuel efficiency, and can reduce the allowable speed of the automobile to approximately 50 km/h (30 mph), but increase traction and braking on snowy or icy surfaces. Some regions require chains to be used under some weather conditions, but other areas prohibit the use of chains, as they can deteriorate road surfaces.

Snow chains were invented in 1904 by Harry D. Weed in Canastota, New York. Weed received U.S. Patent 0,768,495 for his “Grip-Tread for Pneumatic Tires” on August 23, 1904. Weed’s great-grandson, James Weed, said that Harry got the idea of creating chains for tires when he saw drivers wrap rope, or even vines, around their tires to increase traction on muddy or snowy roads, which were very common at the turn of the 20th century.[citation needed] (At this time, most people in rural Northern regions wouldn’t bother driving automobiles in the winter at all, since roads were usually rolled for use with horse-drawn sleighs, rather than plowed. Automobiles were generally not winter vehicles, for a variety of reasons until the 1930s or 1940s in some areas. Only in urban areas was it possible to remove snow from streets.) He sought to make a traction device that was more durable and would work with snow as well as mud.

Wheels on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “CAR”:

French (français [fʁɑ̃sɛ] or langue française [lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the Latin spoken in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d’oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France’s past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

French is an official language in 29 countries across multiple continents, most of which are members of the Organisation internationale de la Francophonie (OIF), the community of 84 countries which share the official use or teaching of French. French is also one of six official languages used in the United Nations. It is spoken as a first language (in descending order of the number of speakers) in: France; Canada (especially in the provinces of Quebec, Ontario, and New Brunswick, as well as other Francophone regions); Belgium (Wallonia and the Brussels-Capital Region); western Switzerland (specifically the cantons forming the Romandy region); parts of Luxembourg; parts of the United States (the states of Louisiana, Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont); Monaco; the Aosta Valley region of Italy; and various communities elsewhere.

CAR on Wikipedia