Wilt

This time we are looking on the crossword puzzle clue for: Wilt.
it’s A 4 letters crossword definition.
Next time when searching the web for a clue, try using the search term “Wilt crossword” or “Wilt crossword clue” when searching for help with your puzzles. Below you will find the possible answers for Wilt.

We hope you found what you needed!
If you are still unsure with some definitions, don’t hesitate to search them here with our crossword puzzle solver.

Possible Answers:

SAG.

Last seen on: NY Times Crossword 4 Sep 19, Wednesday

Random information on the term “Wilt”:

Wilting is the loss of rigidity of non-woody parts of plants. This occurs when the turgor pressure in non-lignified plant cells falls towards zero, as a result of diminished water in the cells. Wilting also serves to reduce water loss, as it makes the leaves expose less surface area. The rate of loss of water from the plant is greater than the absorption of water in the plant. The process of wilting modifies the leaf angle distribution of the plant (or canopy) towards more erectophile conditions.

Lower water availability may result from:

Wilting diminishes the plant’s ability to transpire and grow. Permanent wilting leads to plant death. Symptoms of wilting and blights resemble one another.

In woody plants, reduced water availability leads to cavitation of the xylem.

Wilting occurs in plants such as balsam and holy basil. Wilting is an effect of the plant growth inhibiting hormone, abscisic acid.

With cucurbits, wilting can be caused by the squash vine borer.

Wilt on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SAG”:

In geology a sag, or trough, is a depressed, persistent, low area; the opposite of an arch, or ridge, a raised, persistent, high area. The terms sag and arch were used historically to describe very large features, for example, characterizing North America as two arches with a sag between them.

Also, a sag is a former river bed which has been partially filled with debris from glaciation or other natural processes but which is still visible in the surface terrain. Sags formed by the former river beds of large rivers often become the valleys of smaller streams after a change of course by the main river.

Examples of sags include the former continuations of the Grand, Moreau and White rivers in South Dakota in the United States. Before the last ice age these rivers continued eastward past their current confluences with the present course of Missouri River. The sags are prominently visible on the plateau of the Coteau du Missouri, allowing small streams to drain into the Missouri from its eastern side.

SAG on Wikipedia